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to meet with president mohamed mursi. he could play a critical role in getting a piece deal. reza sayah is live in cairo. i'm wondering from your perspective in cairo how this latest explosion in tel aviv may complicate the hard work ahead for secretary clinton and mohamed mursi? what does it mean for talks and hopes for a cease-fire? >> well it means there's more urgency. it means that the violence is escalating. i think the spotlight is going to be on u.s. secretary of state hillary clinton who is now in the region. if you think you have a busy day today, consider mrs. clinton's itinerary. this morning she met with u.s. secretary of state general ban ki-moon in jerusalem, 9:30 a.m. met with palestinian president mahmoud abbas in ramallah, 11:00 a.m. she met with israeli prime minister benjamin netanyahu in jerusalem again. and now, she's on her way here to cairo. all in an effort to see what we can do, what washington can do, to establish a cease-fire. whenever these conflicts flare up in the middle east, washington wants to be seen as playing a major role. but the problem with washin
, and then shuttled between meetings with netten vahue and president mohamed mursi. i think i'll say finally there, this was a very important test of the egyptian leadership and they passed it. they put pressure on hamas. they put the original deal together. and they are now a very important force in the middle east, the new brotherhood-dominated government. >> suarez: you've both been very cautious. should we also be talking a little bit what is not happening? after the bus bombing there were rising calls inside israel for a land invasion of gaza, and that's not happening. should the world be relieved by that? >> well, the world should be relieved by that. the civilian population in gaza should be relieved by that you know when you go in, you don't know the conditions that will prevail when you're trying to disengage. and this disengagement is not easy. let me address the point ambassador burns mentioned. he was focused on gaza, and he's correct. by the way, hamas all along wanted to have a truth or armstis. not a peace treaty no, peace agreement. they may get that. the point is gaza is only one
, she will then go to egypt and talk with egypt's president mohamed mursi and egypt is taking the lead in this negotiation with hamas. so u.s. believes that egypt is playing a very concrete and positive role, and so it looks like all sides are prepared to give some more time for diplomacy to be worked out. >> christiane, what's your sense of the american role in this decision to halt the ground invasion? obviously, like you said, it would have been very unseemly had it been done while hillary clinton was on the ground there. but is she going because there has been progress? or is she going because she needs to break some sort of stalema stalemate? >> well, probably to lend support, and to, you know, put the u.s. point of view, and to, as they say, look face-to-face at the counterparts and be there in the room with them. this is a very critical time. everybody in this region knows it. of course, everybody in the u.s. knows, too, that the last thing you want is to see a massive escalation of a war in this region that could have the potential negative fallout of spreading in one way or an
, going from meeting to meeting with netanyahu, and heading eventually to meet with mohamed mursi. now we have this violence with a bus. has the window of opportunity, which it seemed like the secretary was trying to exploit, or leverage, has that closed, do you think, with this explosion? >> first of all, this was a reprehensible terrorist attack. but i don't think it closes the window. you've got these very serious talks ongoing about a long-term solution to things like, you know, border security, the rocket attacks, and a lot of international pressure brought to bear by both arab countries, the united states, and the u.n. so, no, i think that this represents an escalation, but i don't think it closes the window to getting some sort of agreement. the real issue will be what happens the day after a cease-fire. whether it can be enforced. and i think we're continually reminded about how hard it is to actually keep these various more radical factions from destabilizing the process. >> so if you're calling it an escalation and we know hillary clinton, one of the words that she keeps reitera
's with mohamed mursi from egypt or benjamin netanyahu has the word, as you just mentioned, deescalate. they want this to be tamped down, and it is probably in israel's interest to do that, to avoid further inflaming the region. but, hamas seems to think that they would benefit from prolonging and es cal eighting the conflict. >> okay. >> i want to get your take on former cia director david petraeus appearing before the house and senate intelligence committee. it seems each party heard different testimony each spinning what he said about the benghazi attack. but the general suggested it was not political. so, shouldn't this lay to rest all the gop complaints? >> it should. but, you know, the level of distrust and partisan animosity and polarization is so great, that republicans have sustained the arguments that were being made at the end of the election campaign, with a remarkable degree of bitterness. john mccain really seems angry and outraged at the performance of susan rice, among others, and the obama administration, and so, harry reid sent a letter yesterday and told john mccain he is not g
Search Results 0 to 9 of about 10 (some duplicates have been removed)

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